House Republicans Gather on Steps of U.S. Capitol to Blast AWOL Harry Reid, Democrats for wanting a Government Shutdown – 9/29/13

Jonah Goldberg on “What’s Next” in Government Funding / ObamaCare Showdown: “Boehner Must Appease House Conservatives” – Video 9/27/13

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House Republicans Lower the Boom on GOP Senators: “Cloture Vote that Gives Harry Reid Green Light to Reinstate ObamaCare…is a Vote for ObamaCare Itself” – 9/27/13

Here is a great new video from the House Republican Conference that tells Harry Reid and Senate Democrats, “No Budget, No Pay!”

It has been more than three years since the U.S. Senate passed a budget, and House Republicans just agreed to a brief increase in the debt-ceiling (3 months) with the stipulation that Senate Democrats would do their job and pass a budget. By contrast, the Republican-led House of Representatives has passed a budget EVERY YEAR.

House Republicans say to Harry Reid and Senate Democrats: “No Budget, No Pay!” – Video 1/23/13

Here is video of MSNBC’s Joe Scarborough saying he believes Republicans are playing it smart in how they are dealing with raising the debt-ceiling temporarily to force the hand of the Senate Democrats to finally pass a budget after more than 3 years of not doing so.

The way Scarborough has too often sounded like a Democrat in recent months, I’m not sure his praise of House Republicans is a good sign.

MSNBC’S Joe Scarborough Praises House GOP as “Playing it Smart” on Temporary Raise of the Debt-Ceiling – Video 1/23/13

Ah the virtue of journalistic impartiality and subtlety.

The media attack on House Republicans for not embracing the tax increase, no spending cut “deal” put together by Joe Biden and Mitch McConnell, has already begun. Here is video of an indignant CNN’s Wolf Blitzer telling GOP Rep. Darrell Issa, “You know, a lot of your constituents are going to hate you. They are going to hate your fellow Republicans in the House of Representatives if you don’t allow new legislation to go forward.”

Impartial Journalist Wolf Blitzer Tells GOP Rep. Darrell Issa: “You Know a Lot of Your Constituents are Going to Hate You” if You Don’t Support the Fiscal Cliff Deal – Video 1/1/13

House Republicans are balking at putting a rubber stamp on the “Fiscal Cliff” Deal passed by the U.S. Senate overnight – a deal that raises tax rates but has almost no spending cuts. Many in the media seemed to assume the House Republicans would feel forced to just go along with it – and they still might. But it is clearly in trouble, with the No.2 Republican in the House – Majority Leader Eric Cantor – saying this afternoon he does not support the bill:

POLITICO: A carefully-crafted Senate compromise to avert the fiscal cliff could be in jeopardy, as House Republicans seem nearly certain to tweak the legislation and send it back to the Senate because it doesn’t contain sufficient spending cuts. The anger came to a head in a closed House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol basement Monday, when the opposition to the bill — which would extend tax rates for families making less than $450,000 — was overwhelming, sources inside the room said.

House Republican leadership dispersed from the meeting mulling how to proceed with the Senate bill, which passed shortly after 2 a.m. Republicans are expected to meet again later Tuesday afternoon to try and settle on a decision.

In a real sign of trouble, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, No. 2 in House leadership, came out in opposition to the package. . . . Read More

House Republicans Balking at Putting Rubber Stamp on “Fiscal Cliff” Deal; No. 2 Eric Cantor Says He Opposes the Deal in Current Form – 1/1/13

The U.S. House of Representatives passed a GOP Bill tonight extending the Payroll Tax Cut through 2012 on a 234-193 vote. The bill also requires construction of the Keystone XL Oil Pipeline from Canada to Texas – something President Obama says he will veto.

MSNBC: Defiant Republicans pushed legislation through the House Tuesday night that would keep alive Social Security payroll tax cuts for some 160 million Americans at President Barack Obama’s request — but also would require construction of a Canada-to-Texas oil pipeline that has sparked a White House veto threat.

Passage, on a largely party-line vote of 234-193, sent the measure toward its certain demise in the Democratic-controlled Senate, triggering the final partisan showdown of a remarkably quarrelsome year of divided government.

The legislation “extends the payroll tax relief, extends and reforms unemployment insurance and protects Social Security — without job-killing tax hikes,” Republican House Speaker John Boehner declared after the measure had cleared.

Referring to the controversy over the Keystone XL pipeline, he added, “Our bill includes sensible, bipartisan measures to help the private sector create jobs.” . . . Read More

Republicans Lead U.S. House Passage of Payroll Tax Cut Extension; Requires Construction of Keystone XL Oil Pipeline

House Speaker John Boehner held a Conference Call tonight with House Republicans to describe to them the Debt Limit Deal reached between President Obama and leaders of Congress. Dave Wiegel over at Slate has a transcript of Boehner’s opening remarks on the call:

SLATE: The press has been filled with reports all day about an agreement. There’s no agreement until we’ve talked to you. There is a framework in place that would cut spending by a larger amount than we raise the debt limit, and cap future spending to limit the growth of government. It would do so without any job-killing tax hikes. And it would also guarantee the American people the vote they have been denied in both chambers on a balanced budget amendment, while creating, I think, some new incentives for past opponents of a BBA to support it.

My hope would be to file it and have it on the floor as soon as possible. I realize that’s not ideal, and I apologize for it. But after I go through it, you’ll realize it’s pretty much the framework we’ve been operating in.

Since Day One of this Congress, we’ve gone toe-to-toe with the Obama Administration and the Democrat-controlled Senate on behalf of our people we were sent here to represent.

Remember how this all started: the White House demanded a “clean” debt limit hike with no spending cuts and reforms attached. We stuck together, and frankly made them give up on that.

Then they shifted to demanding a “balanced” approach – equal parts spending cuts and tax hikes. With this framework, they’ve given up on that, too.

I’m gonna tell you, this has been a long battle – we’ve fought valiantly – and frankly we’ve done it by listening to the American people. And as a result, our framework is now on the table that will end this crisis in a manner that meets our principles of smaller government.

Now listen, this isn’t the greatest deal in the world. But it shows how much we’ve changed the terms of the debate in this town.

There is nothing in this framework that violates our principles. It’s all spending cuts. The White House bid to raise taxes has been shut down. And as I vowed back in May – when everyone thought I was crazy for saying it – every dollar of debt limit increase will be matched by more than a dollar of spending cuts. And in doing this, we’ve stopping a job-killing national default that none of us wanted.

House Speaker John Boehner on Debt Limit Deal: “The (Obama) White House Bid to Raise Taxes has been Shut Down” – 7/31/11

House Speaker John Boehner will gather with House Republicans this morning to regroup, and decide how to move forward with a vote on his plan to raise the debt-ceiling and cut spending. Whether it will be the same plan he tried and failed to get the votes for yesterday, a revamped plan, or a totally different plan, remains to be seen:

C-SPAN: After a setback, the U.S. House will try again Friday to pass a bill to lift the debt ceiling. A vote that was scheduled to take place early Thursday evening became late Thursday night before Republican leadership pulled the bill from the floor.

House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) spent the evening attempting to finalize support for his bill but fell short, causing him to postpone the vote for at least another day. The Republican conference is expected to gather Friday morning to regroup and chart a course forward.

The Senate, meanwhile, is continuing to wait for the House to act before it takes up any legislation to lift the debt ceiling. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) said he will hold a vote to table, or discard, the House bill immediately after – and if – the House passes the bill.

Senator Reid said “every Democratic Senator would vote against” Boehner’s plan, making it impossible to pass in the Democratic-led Senate, he said.

No agreement between Republicans and Democrats and within the Republican Party means the path forward is still uncertain with four days until the August 2nd deadline imposed by Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner. . . . Read More

Boehner Trying to Regroup on Debt-Ceiling Bill; Will Meet with GOP Conference this Morning to Decide what to Do – 7/29/11

Byron York is reporting that Republicans in the House are getting ready to bring forward a two-part plan that would extend the Debt Ceiling in the short-term, and prepare for long-term deficit reduction:

WASHINGTON EXAMINER: House Republicans are finishing work on a new proposal to resolve the standoff over the debt ceiling. The proposal, set to be finished and crafted into the form of a bill by Sunday, will be in two parts. The first will combine a short-term increase in the debt ceiling with spending cuts. The second will lay the groundwork for a longer-term increase in the debt ceiling coupled with far-reaching deficit reduction.

“Senator Reid said on Friday that he is going to wait for us to move,” says a well-informed GOP House aide. “So we’ll move.” Another well-informed aide confirmed the basic outline of what’s happening.

Staff of the House Rules Committee is involved in the work, which is an indication that the process is nearing completion. Before any bill can be considered on the House floor, the Rules Committee must first pass a rule setting out the process for its consideration. Once the proposal is finished, it would likely be posted on the Rules Committee website, probably no later than Monday, so the committee could meet to consider it on Tuesday and it could be on the House floor by Wednesday.

Work on the new proposal was underway before negotiations with the White House blew up on Friday. Sources say the plan was being created last week, even as the House leadership devoted considerable time to passing the “Cut, Cap, and Balance” proposal. Once the Senate Democratic leadership blocked “Cut, Cap, and Balance,” House leaders stepped up work on the new proposal. Right now, the new direction is believed to be the only way forward. “McConnell-Reid is just not a viable option in the House,” the aide says, referring to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell’s complicated proposal to allow the president to increase the debt ceiling. . . . Read More

Report: House Republicans to Bring Forward Two-Part Plan to Raise Debt Limit; Reduce the Deficit – 7/23/11

House Republicans will spend part of tomorrow emphasizing the fundamentals – the U.S. Constitution. They will do so in dramatic fashion by reading the U.S. Constitution aloud in the House Chamber – something that has never been done before, as far as anyone knows:

FOX NEWS:. . . . Boehner will begin Thursday by reading the Constitution’s preamble: “We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.”

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., will follow suit with Article 1, Section 1, which states that Congress will have a Senate and a House of Representatives. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., then reads Article 1, Section 2. Members will continue on until they have read the entire Constitution and its amendments. They will not get to choose which section they read.

Goodlatte expects the proceeding to take 90 minutes. They will use one copy of the document to do the entire reading, and will pass it between members. . . . . Read More

House Republicans to Begin by Reading the U.S. Constitution Aloud

House Republicans have released their “Pledge to America,” which outlines what they pledge to do if the GOP regains control of the House of Representatives in November. You can read the document embedded below.

The document is 21-pages long, and is organzied under various categories of issues. There are a number of very good things in the “Pledge,” but it amazes me that people don’t seem to understand that no one is going to remember a 21-page document! For something like this, you need four or five key points that can be easily understood and remembered. It ought to fit on a half-sheet of paper. No matter how good the content of a document like this, it is useless if people can’t remember what’s in it.

I’ve noticed this in recent years with many politicians. During the 2008 campaign, several candidates released pledges with 8, 10, 12 “points.” That’s just too many. It’s the same principle as if making a speech. No one wants to listen to a 20 point speech or sermon. It’s too long. You have to boil it down to the key 3-5 things you want people to focus on and remember.

GOP Pledge to America

House Republicans Release their “Pledge to America”

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